Guest Video: Psiloritis Geopark


People have lived on the island of Crete for at least nine millennia, and today the center of this island where history, myth, and reality blend together is a UNESCO geopark.



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Guest Video: Tumbler Ridge, British Columbia


There will come a point in this drone video, made in the UNESCO Tumbler Ridge Geopark, when you will wonder where the dinosaurs came from. Here you go.

Seriously, look at those flat rock formations: that’s all undisturbed sedimentary rocks that have accumulated over a vast amount of geologic time. Of course there are fossils in there! (Bonus points if you can spot the cirques; here’s more geological background.)



Here’s a bit more about the dinosaurs. To show how far out in the wilderness this geopark is, note the hope expressed that they won’t need much helicopter support:

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Guest Videos: Dunhuang Yardang National Geopark


For today’s geopark, believe it or not, we need to start out on Mars!



“Yardang” doesn’t sound like a typical scientific term (in English, anyway), and it isn’t. It’s Ugyur for the same type of rock formation on Earth, and it was first used by geologists to describe these desert features near Dunhaung in China.

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Guest Videos: San’in Kaigan Geopark


I am not sure if everything in this video is part of the San’in Kaigan Geopark, but it certainly conveys the general feel of the place.



Daisen last erupted in the Pleistocene, per the Global Volcanism Program.

According to Wikipedia, one of the most popular destinations here is Genbudo Park, with its five caves and lovely basalt columns, but let’s look at views of Toyooka, too.



I like it that UNESCO geoparks include the human aspects of places, too.


Featured image: Hashi Photo, CC BY 3.0 DE