Guest Video: The Salton Sea


A study at the end of June made headlines about earthquake hazard on the San Andreas Fault. The research looked at the area covered by the Salton Sea:


https://youtu.be/-OqrZG-EBaQ&rel=0


According to news reports, geologists found:

. . . a nearly 15.5-mile-long, sheared zone with two, nearly parallel master faults and hundreds of smaller, rung-like cross faults. . . The discovery . . . reveals the southern tip of the San Andreas Fault changes fairly gradually into the ladder-like Brawley Seismic zone. The structure trends northwest, extending from the well-known main trace of the San Andreas Fault along the Salton Sea’s northeastern shore, to the newly identified East Shoreline Fault Zone on the San Andreas’ opposite edge.

. . .

Future earthquakes in that zone or near the San Andreas Fault could potentially trigger a cascade of earthquakes leading to the overdue major quake scientists expect along the southern San Andreas fault zone . . .

So, perhaps it’s good that the “Riviera” scheme never worked out.

While seismologists scramble over the area to learn more about earthquake hazards, the USGS is monitoring the local volcano situation–which includes five vents discovered in 2013–through the California Volcano Observatory.

Again, not a good place for a resort!


Featured image: 12019, at Pixabay. Public domain.


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Guest Video: Preparedness Now, The Great California Shakeout

 
We took part in the Great ShakeOut here in Oregon this week. I didn’t do too well, so it was a terrific wake-up call. However, I was disappointed by the reaction of many people.

While scheduling some guest videos for you, in the unlikely event that my writing projects tie me up for part of next week, I came across this one, “Preparedness Now, The Great California ShakeOut.” It’s good enough to share today.

Remember, when the ground starts moving, duck, cover, and hold on! And as I learned this week, just thinking through your disaster plan doesn’t work too well – do a walk-through.