Tag: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Meanwhile, at Kilauea . . .

Update, November 24, 2018, 7:26 a.m., Pacific: Per the volcanologists, who kindly replied by email, this cloud coming out of the caldera, captured on the cam shot (below), was: Volcanic gases — visibility of plume is more pronounced in early mornings and evenings when warm gases condense as they are released into cooler air temperatures.

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Meanwhile, at Kilauea . . .

Both the USGS and Paradise Copters got some nice images yesterday, which are worth sharing here in addition to posting them on the Kilauea page as usual (see link at menu up above). The HVO updates are here–today’s hasn’t been posted as of the time of this post. First, there’s a little cone (volcanologists call

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Livestream of Kilauea’s Summit Crater

The lava fountains and human drama in Hawaii’s Lower Puna District are getting all the headlines, but geologists know there is also drama ongoing at the summit, where the volcano’s crater seems to have been slowly collapsing since the lava lake drained. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory staff were forced to move farther away from the summit

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Another Kilauea Update

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory/USGS just issued this; I think they mean that the overall deflation at Kilauea’s floor has been 3 feet, not that it dropped that much today. But it’s worth giving you a heads-up because the floor of Kilauea’s summit crater has collapsed before (there’s nobody in it, don’t worry) and it could

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Frank A. Perret Versus the Volcano

All volcanologists must be a little crazy somewhere deep down inside. Frank Alvord Perret was perhaps the craziest, or so it seems to a layman. Why else would he stick a crowbar down almost the length of his arm into the brightly glowing fissure of an erupting volcano and then pull the bar out again…just

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