Category: Geoscientist of the Week

Guest Videos: The Geologist Who Lunged At Douglas Fairbanks With A Sword

Volcanology and seismology are the geological fields most of us think of when we hear the word “geologist,” but there is much more to it. However, this is usually not the sort of work that captures the public imagination: Sometimes, though, the stars align even for the humble field geologist. Literally. This story is from

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James Hutton – Founder of Modern Geology

Decided to update this 2014 post with a nice video I just found. Hope you enjoy it, too! Scotland’s James Hutton is called the founder of modern geology. How can that be? He was a chemist, after all. Well, for starters, a lot of geology involves chemistry (as I found out to my sorrow as

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Guest Videos: Thomas Condon and the John Day Fossil Beds

I’m writing an ebook series on cats and how they evolved, and it’s tempting sometimes to take a break and head into Eastern Oregon, where sabertoothed cat-like apex predators called nimravids now sleep, along with their prey, in the John Day country. I haven’t been there yet, but will visit the area as soon as

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Guest Videos: Mikhail Lomonosov

You might run across the word “Lomonosov” in the news soon. A ridge of that name is a big part of Russia’s claim to the Arctic, and the UN committee that is responsible for deciding such territorial claims just began a new session. This ridge is named after a famous 18th-century Russian polymath–Mikhail Lomonosov–who, among

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Guest Video: Discoverers of Earth’s Deep Layering

At the end of June, researchers suggested adding some new details to the present scientific model of Earth’s outer central core; it’s rather arcane, but the news is a good reminder for us all to honor those who accurately imagined the Earth’s structure without the aid of supercomputers or other modern tools. These thinkers were

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Guest Videos: Friedrich Mohs

Although I love geoscience, I’m not a geologist, though I tried to become one. Mineralogy lab was tough – you had to identify rocks without using labels. Sadly, YouTube and the Geology Kitchen weren’t around yet. It’s even worse out in the field, of course. The Mohs hardness scale was a lifesaver. Where did it

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