If Twitter Was Around When Mount St. Helens Blew


It’s wonderful (from a distance) to follow the ongoing eruption at Kilauea via the Web. Twitter is especially helpful.

I’ve been wondering what the 1980 reawakening and eruption of Mount St. Helens would have been like on Twitter. Here are some tweets I’ve found from volcanologists and other interested people who have not forgotten May 18, 1980, as well as a movie from the National Archives.

A good overview of the entire event is in Volcano Cowboys. I’m not connected with that book in any way–just really liked how it presented this and other eruptions in a human context.



August, 1964:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



Undated

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



March 31, 1980:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



April 9:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



April 10:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



April `13:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



April 13:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



April 27:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



April 28:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



April 30:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



May 2:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



May 4:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



May 5 through May 11:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



May 11:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



May 16:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



May 17, 1980:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



May 18:



https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



Twitter hastag #msh35



https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js



Two well-known volcanologist fatalities are associated with Mount St. Helens. Their stories are very well covered in the book mentioned above.

David Johnston, of course, had those famous last words (which apparently were heard by local ham radio operators but did not make it to the USGS post in Vancouver, Washington):

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

After the blast, Harry Glicken went over the debris field, working out exactly how the north flank of the volcano had come apart.

Later, in 1991, he perished at Unzen Volcano in Japan in a pyroclastic surge, along with Maurice and Katia Krafft and others.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js


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